Akanksha Vaidya Tartan Alumna

Class of 2011

Articles

  • Undergraduate students awarded NSF Research Fellowships

    Left with only a few weeks to graduation, many seniors have already made future plans. While most may be looking forward to working after graduating, some intend to veer toward a less traditional direction. Among these are Mariela Zeledón, Geeta Shroff, Henry Deyoung, Melissa Bartel, and Arbob Ahmad, five seniors who received graduate research fellowships from the National Science Foundation (NSF)...

    SciTech | April 21, 2008
  • SciTech Briefs

    CO2 levels benefit marine algae

    Recent studies show that acidification of the oceans may actually be beneficial to coccolithophores, single-celled algae enclosed in carbonate shells.

    Studies conducted by scientists at the University of Southampton in England and the University of Oxford showed that when carbon dioxide was bubbled into water, the algae grew bigger in size.

    SciTech | April 21, 2008
  • Scientists facilitate self-assembly of nanoparticles

    With the scaling down of many devices, nano and microparticles have gained prestige in the world of technology. However, when dealing with devices that use such particles, the arrangement of the particles is an important factor.

    SciTech | April 14, 2008
  • How Things Work: Nanotechnology

    A college student might spend the night nursing a sore back because of carrying around volumes of books and a laptop all day. Given this, it is reasonable enough to wish for a scrap of paper which would have everything written on it. However, compared to particles that are one-billionth of a meter in each dimension, a scrap of paper is gigantic.

    SciTech | April 14, 2008
  • Children experiment with roBlocks

    LEGO is perhaps the most universal childhood activity; generations of children have been entertained by the little plastic blocks that can be put together to form absolutely anything. However, the all-time favorite toy now has a high-tech competitor created by none other than Carnegie Mellon specialists.

    SciTech | April 7, 2008