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Climate change continues to be serious issue

Climate change continues to be serious issue (credit: Emily Giedzinski/) Climate change continues to be serious issue (credit: Emily Giedzinski/) Climate change continues to be serious issue while CA is on fire with new progressive legislation (credit: Eunice Oh/) Climate change continues to be serious issue while CA is on fire with new progressive legislation (credit: Eunice Oh/)
Editorials featured in the Forum section are solely the opinions of their individual authors.

Climate change is a hot-button topic, as it should be, with bitter divisions over its impact and implications for the future. With all the media buzz, it’s easy to dismiss it as clickbait and journalistic hyperbole. However, global warming is still an exceedingly serious issue, and should be treated as such.

The European Space Agency released a report just last week from the GOCE (Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer), detailing its findings on how the loss of ice from Western Antarctica between 2009 and 2012 has caused a dip in the gravitational field in the region. Dips in gravity aren’t abnormal, but usually those dips take place slowly, over thousands of years, according to Discovery News.

While scientists do not yet know the direct impact such rapid changes in gravity will have, the fact remains: Climate change is now altering the way fundamental laws of our planet work, laws that have governed our environment for millions of years.

According to a Stanford University study funded by the National Science Foundation, climate change is causing unprecedented drought in California. Scientific American predicts that the desert climate of the Sahara will begin pushing northward; southern Europe is already experiencing intense droughts. Whether or not people want to accept climate change as a problem, it is.

It’s important to separate political ideology from scientific fact. There is no question that climate change is a rapidly escalating problem. To deny this fact is, simply put, scientifically misguided. Of course, it is easy to become overwhelmed by the sheer size of the problem, to feel lost in the crush of dire circumstance.

However, people should not look at every newly found environmental crisis as another sign that the world is coming to an end. Instead, people should look at each new piece of information as a personal call to action, an impetus to change the way we look at, and interact with, the environmental world.