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Health Line

Viagra may hinder sense of smell

Large doses of the drug sildenafil, also known as Viagra, may weaken one’s sense of smell. German researchers at the University of Dresden Medical School conducted a study of 20 male subjects. The subjects were given either 50-mg or 100-mg Viagra doses or placebos and then exposed to different odors.

Researchers measured the subjects’ odor detection threshold, odor differentiation and odor identification abilities. Researchers found that individuals who had taken the 100-mg dose had a more difficult time detecting and differentiating odors compared to individuals who had taken placebos. On the other hand, individuals who had taken the 50-mg dose experienced no significant change in their sense of smell.

Source: CNN

Cancer death drop suggests trend

For the second consecutive year, the number of deaths due to cancer in the United States has decreased by about 1 percent. Researchers say this drop in deaths could be the start of a downward trend resulting from improvements in detection of cancers and broader anti-smoking campaigns.

Experts also attribute this decline in cancer deaths to improved and more widespread screenings for colorectal cancer and to the increased availability of treatment drugs around the turn of the century. Nonetheless, cancer is still one of the leading causes of death in the United States, second to heart disease.

Source: The New York Times

Viagra may hinder sense of smell

Large doses of the drug sildenafil, also known as Viagra, may weaken one’s sense of smell. German researchers at the University of Dresden Medical School conducted a study of 20 male subjects. The subjects were given either 50-mg or 100-mg Viagra doses or placebos and then exposed to different odors.

Researchers measured the subjects’ odor detection threshold, odor differentiation and odor identification abilities. Researchers found that individuals who had taken the 100-mg dose had a more difficult time detecting and differentiating odors compared to individuals who had taken placebos. On the other hand, individuals who had taken the 50-mg dose experienced no significant change in their sense of smell.

Source: CNN

Cancer death drop suggests trend

For the second consecutive year, the number of deaths due to cancer in the United States has decreased by about 1 percent. Researchers say this drop in deaths could be the start of a downward trend resulting from improvements in detection of cancers and broader anti-smoking campaigns.

Experts also attribute this decline in cancer deaths to improved and more widespread screenings for colorectal cancer and to the increased availability of treatment drugs around the turn of the century. Nonetheless, cancer is still one of the leading causes of death in the United States, second to heart disease.

Source: The New York Times